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Contents

2. Linear Models for Continuous Data

3. Logit Models for Binary Data

4. Poisson Models for Count Data

5. Log-Linear Models for Contingency Tables

6. Multinomial Response Models

7. Survival Models

A. Review of Likelihood Theory

B. Generalized Linear Model Theory

Browsing or Printing?

The notes are offered in two formats: HTML and PDF, see the discussion below for more details.

I expect most of you will want to print the notes, in which case you can use the links below to access the PDF file for each chapter:

Chapters in PDF format
2. Linear Models for Continuous Data
3. Logit Models for Binary Data
4. Poisson Models for Count Data
4a*. Addendun on Overdispersed Count Data
5. Log-Linear Models for Contingency Tables
6. Multinomial Response Models
7. Survival Models
8*. Panel and Clustered Data
A. Review of Likelihood Theory
B. Generalized Linear Model Theory

If you are browsing you can use the links in the tab strip above to go to the start of each chapter, or use the table of contents on the right to go directly to a specific section.

No, there is no Chapter 1 ... yet. One day I will write an introduction to the course and that will be Chapter 1.

* The list above has two extensions to the original notes: an addendum on Modeling Over-Dispersed Count Data, which describes models with extra-Poisson variation and negative binomial regression, and a brief discussion of models for longitudinal and clustered data.

Suggested Citation

Rodríguez, G. (2007). Lecture Notes on Generalized Linear Models. Available at http://data.princeton.edu/wws509/notes/

The Choice of Formats

It turns out that making the lecture notes available on the web was a bit of a challenge, because the web browsers in current use were designed to render text and graphs but not equations.  After looking at a number of options, I decided to offer the notes in two formats: HTML and PDF.

Each format has its advantages but none is perfect. Hopefully a better solution will be available once MathML becomes standard. For more information see the references below.

Errata

If you find an error in the notes please let me know.  Make sure you note the section (e.g. 2.1.7) or page, and as much detail as you can. I will keep an up-to-date list of corrections online.

References

The notes were prepared using LaTeX, which produces PostScript or PDF. I generated the HTML pages from the original LaTeX source using a program called TtH written by Ian Hutchinson.  I found the output from this program better than alternatives such as LaTeX2Html.

If you are interested in the problem of publishing mathematics on the Web you may want to visit the W3C Mathematics page, which describes MathML and provides a number of useful links.  You may also want to read Ian Hutchinson's views, including comments and links to reviews of various approaches.


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